Winter Weather Liability

Snow and Ice in Premises Liability

»Posted by on Feb 10, 2017 in Winter Weather Liability | 0 comments

Places open to the public, such as businesses like restaurants and retail spaces, should be safe from accidents and injuries. If owners disregard this responsibility and a person has been injured, they may be held liable. This is called premises liability.

According to the website of the Cranston, Rhode Island personal injury attorneys of the Law Offices of Ronald J. Resmini, LTD., the vast majority of serious injuries arising out of snow and ice result from premises liability cases.

Many of these injuries come from slip and fall accidents that have resulted from snowy and icy conditions. Property owners who are not maintaining their front doors, front steps, walkways leading to their areas, and sidewalks in front of their property, may be taken to court, especially when an injury has been sustained because of their failure to see and fix the snow and ice conditions in their property.

Slip and fall injuries should not be taken lightly, because they can be fatal or lifelong. The worst slip and fall injuries include head and brain trauma, paralysis and other spinal cord issues, back problems, and fractures. Sometimes, these injuries are sustained because of a chain reaction. If the victim has slipped from the sidewalk and landed on the road, he or she may get hit by a passing vehicle and result into further traumatic injury.

As a property owner, you can avoid snow and ice issues, slip and fall accidents, and premises liability claims by properly monitoring your premises for possible snow and ice buildups and slippery spots. If dangerous conditions have been monitored, act accordingly to reverse the dangerous condition.

As an ordinary person, you should also avoid accidents on your own and not rely entirely on the property owner’s compliance and the law’s enforcement. Wear the proper footwear to avoid slips, trips, and falls. Always be wary of your surroundings, especially when there is snow and ice.

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